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Want to take control of the 2022 election? Make a plan to vote and stick to it. Here’s how.

This midterm election is all about control — control over our bodies, our lives, and our country’s future. As anti-abortion rights politicians push dangerous bans, abortion rights supporters need to turn out like never before. Our freedom depends on it. 

Plan ahead to make sure you don’t miss your chance to vote. These three simple vote-ready questions will help. Answer, then share this guide with your friends.

Question #1: Are you registered to vote?

There is no automatic voter registration in the U.S. Check to see if you’re registered.

If you’re not, register before your state’s deadline.

  • Most states offer online registration.
    Have your driver's license number or the last four digits of your Social Security number handy — you’ll need it to submit your registration.

  • Many states offer in-person registration at local boards of elections, public libraries, high schools, or other government agencies.

  • Voter registration at the Department of Motor Vehicles, DMV, is available in lots of states. If you’re applying for — or renewing — your driver’s license, ask how you can register to vote while you’re there.

  • Some states let you register on Election Day.
    Check your state’s same-day registration rules, including ID requirements and location. Note: Registration might happen at a separate location than  your polling place.

Once you’re registered, it’s time to figure out how you’ll vote.

Question #2: Are you voting early in person or absentee by mail?

Voting by mail remains safe and accessible. A paper trail and strong security measures help secure the authenticity of ballots.

Eight states — California, Colorado, Hawaii, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Vermont and Washington — have all-mail elections, so you should receive ballots to put in a mailbox or dropbox. If you live outside these 8 states and you still want to either mail your ballot or vote in person early, follow these steps.

How to Vote Early, In Person


STEP 1

Check availability.

  • Check Vote.org to see if your state offers early, in-person voting.
  • Usually, the early voting window is a few weeks before Election Day.

​​​​STEP 2

Find your early voting location.

  • Your early voting center is usually in your county election office. 
  • Check the early voting center’s hours. 
  • Mark your calendar and plan a specific time to visit. Give yourself plenty of time; lines may be long.

​​​​​​STEP 3

Cast your ballot.

  • At your early voting center, check in to vote and get your ballot.
  • Hand in your ballot — by placing it in a dropbox.

How to Vote Absentee By Mail


STEP 1

Register to vote absentee as early as possible. 

  • Check your state’s absentee ballot rules and deadlines.
  • Request a mail-in ballot, including an excuse if your state requires one. 
  • Are you a military service member or overseas citizen?
    See if you need a notary to authorize your absentee ballot.

STEP 2

Mail in your ballot before the deadline.

  • Absentee ballots come in a self-addressed envelope, so you can put it in the mailbox by the postmark deadline.
  • Missed the mail-in deadline?
    Check for exceptions:
    Some states let people who got absentee ballots vote at the polls on Election Day, and some have ballot dropboxes open through Election Day.

STEP 3

Track your ballot and make sure it’s delivered.

  • Online absentee/mail-in ballot tracking may be available.
    See if your state’s election or secretary-of-state office offers it. If they do, then track your vote-by-mail status. 
  • If you see that your ballot hasn’t been counted, find out what provisions your state offers for lost ballots.

Question #3: Are you voting on Election Day, November 8?

If your answer is “yes,” follow the steps below to make a plan to go to the polls.
 

Make a Plan to Vote at the Polls on Election Day


STEP 1: SCHEDULING

On Election Day, what time do you plan to arrive at the polling station? 

  • Figure out what time you need to leave home so you won’t be late.
  • Factor in long wait times in case your polling place is crowded.
  • Plan to arrive as early as possible, and give yourself plenty of time.

STEP 2: PREPPING

What do you need to take care of so you can get to the polls? 

  • If needed, ask for time off work.
  • If you’re a parent, arrange for child care or plan to bring your kids with you.
  • Bring snacks and water for yourself and your kids in case there’s a long line.

STEP 3: DOCUMENTATION

What forms do you need to complete? What identification do you need to bring? 


STEP 4: TRANSPORTATION

How will you get to the polls?

  • Will you get to the polls by foot, bike, car, or public transportation?
  • Arrange for a ride to or from the polls if you need one.

STEP 5: COMMUNICATION

Who might you need to speak with?

  • Have your cell phone charged in case you need to contact someone while you’re in line. 
  • Identify who you’ll speak with if you’re in line for longer than expected.
  • Save 866-OUR-VOTE, the Election Protection hotline, in your phone. Call the hotline if you think your rights have been violated or to report any problem with the voting process; attorneys are standing by.

Dates to Remember

  • Oct. 9:
    Marks 30 days before Election Day — the deadline in many states to register to vote.
  • Oct. 28:
    Share posts about Vote Early Day on social media or lead an event.

Take Control: Commit to Vote

Pledge to use your voice and vote by Election Day, November 8 — because when we all show up, we can take back power to control our bodies, our lives, and our futures

Take the Pledge

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