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We flipped the U.S. House. In doing so, we sent a message to politicians: Protect our reproductive rights or lose your job.

It’s been two years since Donald Trump won the U.S. presidency. Ever since then, we’ve fought like hell against endless attacks on our health and rights. We protested in the streets, at the White House, in the U.S. Capitol. We fought to protect our health, our rights, our lives. And our work paid off.

Tonight, we took back some power.

By getting our communities to the polls in record numbers, we flipped the House of Representatives to a pro-women’s health majority.

And we're just getting started. Now that we've won the House, we’re empowered to act as a check and defend our country against the Trump-Pence administration's agenda.

Our votes sent a message to political leaders: We want a world where everyone has access to health care. Protect our health and rights, or we’ll vote you out.

A record number of women ran and won, and we elected a number of historic firsts. But this pink wave didn’t crest on its own. Champions of reproductive rights won because millions of concerned people like you stepped up and showed up. You showed up for LGBTQ people, communities of color, undocumented people, women, and more.

For two years, we’ve fought like hell. And it’s working.

We won’t be silenced. We won’t be intimidated. We’ll march, we’ll organize, we’ll run for office, we’ll vote, and we’ll WIN. 

Health care was the number one issue for voters this Election Day. And we won’t let our new leaders forget it. We’ll be reminding them that we elected them to defend our health and rights — no exceptions. They’ve got a job to do, and we’re going to make sure they do it. That includes:

We’re celebrating now, but our work isn’t done. Far from it. Donald Trump still wakes up in the White House every morning, determined to work with the administration to attack our reproductive rights and roll back freedoms for millions of people. There will be plenty of attacks in the weeks and months to come — and we’ll be fighting back.

Help us keep up the fight.

With your help, we continue our work to make sure EVERYONE has access to the health care they need.

Donate now

We’re ready to hit the ground running, and we know you’ll be right there with us. In the meantime, let’s savor these historic accomplishments. We did it! Then roll up your sleeves and join us in getting back to work — there’s plenty left to do.

Some of the Historic Firsts We're Celebrating 

Election Day 2018 ushered in an incredible round of firsts, with people who have not seen themselves represented in elected office winning key seats at the table.

  • Chris Pappas (NH-01), first openly gay member of Congress to represent New Hampshire

  • Jared Polis (CO-Gov), first openly gay man elected governor

  • Paulette Jordan (ID-Gov), first Native American governor

  • Deb Haaland (NM-01), one of the first Native American women to serve in the U.S. House

  • Sharice Davids (KS-03), one of the first Native American women to serve in Congress and the first openly LGBTQ person to represent Kansas

  • Ayanna Pressley (MA-07), first black member of Congress to represent Massachusetts

  • Ilhan Omar (MN-05), first Somali-American in Congress, one of the first Muslim women in Congress, and the first woman of color elected to Congress to represent Minnesota

  • Rashida Tlaib (MI-13), one of the first Muslim women in Congress

  • Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (NY-14), the youngest woman ever elected to Congress

  • Abby Finkenauer (IA-01), one of the youngest women elected to Congress and one of the first women to represent Iowa

  • Angie Craig (MN-02), first LGBTQ member of Congress to represent Minnesota

  • Veronica Escobar (TX-16), one of the first Latinas to represent Texas in Congress 

  • Sylvia Garcia (TX-29), one of the first Latinas to represent Texas in Congress 

  • Cindy Axne (IA-03), one of the first women to represent Iowa in Congress

  • Mandela Barnes (WI), first Black lieutenant governor in Wisconsin

  • Tish James (NY), First Black attorney general of New York

  • Michelle Lujan Grisham (NM-Gov), one of the first Latina Democratic governors

  • Janet Mills (ME-Gov), Maine’s first female governor

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