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Democrat

Amy Klobuchar

For U.S. Senate
Minnesota

Voting Record

Planned Parenthood Action Fund is the source of this data.

  • Alignment 100%
  • Blocking Planned Parenthood Health Centers From Participation In Crucial Safe...

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    On Aug. 23, 2018, Sens. Rand Paul (R-Kentucky) and Mike Lee (R-Utah) proposed an amendment to the Department of Defense, Labor HHS Appropriations Act, 2019 (H.R. 6157) which would block Planned Parenthood health centers from participating in critical safety-net programs, including the Title X family planning program, Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program, and Medicaid in Fiscal Year 2019. The Paul-Lee Amendment would block millions of people from receiving basic and preventive care at the health care provider of their choice and would be devastating for health care access across the country. Not only does this amendment hurt the millions of people who rely on Planned Parenthood for their health care needs, is is also a wildly unpopular proposal that has previously been rejected and is out of touch with 75 percent of Americans who do not support “defunding” Planned Parenthood health centers. This amendment not only failed to get the 60 votes required to move forward, it didn’t even reach a simple majority, demonstrating this amendment is out of touch for the majority of voters. A vote AGAINST the Paul-Lee Amendment was a vote in support of women’s health. The amendment failed the Senate with a vote of 45-48.

  • Banning Abortion At 20 Weeks Nationwide

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    On Jan. 16, 2018, Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-South Carolina) introduced the deceptively named “Pain-Capable Unborn Child Act,” which would ban all abortions at 20 weeks with very limited exceptions. This bill is the Senate companion bill to H.R. 36, which was voted on and passed in the House of Representatives Oct. 3, 2017. S. 2311 denies a woman access to an abortion, even if she experienced severe, dangerous health complications as a result of her pregnancy. It would also subject a doctor to criminal penalties for performing a safe, legal medical procedure at 20 weeks. Additionally, S. 2311 would prohibit a doctor from providing care, even if the pregnancy is diagnosed with serious fetal anomalies. Many doctors, including the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), oppose these laws because they prevent them from giving their patients the best health care possible in an individual situation. This bill failed to get the 60 votes required to move forward. A vote AGAINST S. 2311 was a vote in support of women’s health. The bill failed the Senate with a vote of 51-46.

  • "Skinny Repeal" Of The Affordable Care Act

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    In the early morning hours of July 28, 2017, the Senate voted on the American Health Care Act, often referred to as the “Skinny Repeal” bill. It would have been a disaster for women, reversing years of progress for women’s health. If passed, this bill would have blocked Medicaid patients from receiving care at Planned Parenthood health centers and blocked up to 32 million people from insurance by 2026. The care Planned Parenthood provides is too crucial for millions of women for politicians to use as a political football; approximately one in five women has relied on a Planned Parenthood health center for care in her lifetime. In 2015, Planned Parenthood health centers saw 2.4 million patients and provided more than 4.2 million tests and treatments for sexually transmitted infections, more than 320,000 breast exams, nearly 295,000 Pap tests, and provided birth control to nearly two million women. A vote AGAINST the American Health Care Act was considered a vote in support of women's health The bill failed with a vote of 49-51.

  • Restricting Access To Private Health Plans Which Cover Abortion

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    On July 27, 2017, the Senate voted on the Strange Amendment to H.R. 1628. This amendment, introduced by Senator Luther Strange of Alabama, would have restructured the tax credits in the underlying legislation in order to restrict coverage of abortion. This Strange Amendment was not about segregating federal funds from abortion – it centered on limiting access to safe and legal abortion. This proposal needlessly restricted women’s access to private plans that offer abortion coverage. Health plans participating in the marketplace may already choose whether or not to offer coverage of abortion, unless state law prohibits or requires abortion coverage A vote AGAINST the Strange Amendment was considered a vote in support of women's health The amendment required 60 votes for passage, and failed with a vote of 50-50.

  • "Repeal And Delay" ACA Bill

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    On July 27, 2017, the Senate voted on the Paul Amendment, formally known as the Obamacare Repeal Reconciliation Act. This amendment, sometimes referred to as “Repeal and Delay,” was introduced by Senator Rand Paul of Kentucky. If passed would have fully repealed the Affordable Care Act (ACA), but delay implementation of the repeal until at least 2020. Similar to the other ACA repeal attempts, this amendment would block Medicaid patients from receiving care at Planned Parenthood health centers and leave 22 to 32 million people without insurance by 2026. A vote AGAINST the Paul Amendment was considered a vote in support of women's health The amendment failed with a vote of 44-55.

  • Gutting The Affordable Care Act

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    On July 25, 2017, the Senate voted on the McConnell Amendment, commonly known as the Better Care Reconciliation Act. This amendment, introduced by Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, would not only have blocked women from coming to Planned Parenthood for birth control and lifesaving preventive care. It would have also left between 22 and 32 million people without insurance by 2026, cut back on subsidies that help people afford coverage, and slashed Medicaid coverage for one in 5 women of reproductive age who rely on to access birth control, cancer screenings, and preventive care. This amendment failed with a strong bipartisan vote in opposition. A vote AGAINST the McConnell Amendment was considered a vote in support of women's health The amendment failed with a vote of 43-57.

  • American Health Care Act Procedural Vote

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    On July 25, 2017, the Senate voted on a procedural motion to open debate on the American Health Care Act (H.R. 1628), a bill which would have cut off 22 to 32 million people from health insurance by 2026 and blocked Medicaid patients from accessing care at Planned Parenthood health centers. While this vote was only procedural, H.R. 1628 was one of the most dangerous pieces of legislation for women’s health in a generation, which is why it was so important to try stop it early before it advanced in the Senate. The vote came down to the razor thin 50-50 vote. When a Senate vote ends in a tie the vice president of the United States serves as the tie breaker. Vice President Pence voted in favor of the motion to proceed. A vote AGAINST the Motion to Proceed was considered a vote in support of women's health The motion passed with a vote of 51-50.

  • Limiting Provider Access To Title X Family Planning Program

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    In Dec. 2016, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) issued a final rule protecting patient access to trusted reproductive health providers under the Title X program, the nation’s only family planning program. In response to state attempts to ban abortion providers from Title X, the rule reinforces that women’s health providers cannot be prohibited from serving people under the program for reasons unrelated to their ability to provide Title X care, including birth control and cancer screenings. This rule reiterates longstanding federal law and became effective on Jan. 18, 2017. Introduced on Jan. 30, 2017 by Congresswoman Diane Black (R-Tennessee), H.J. Res. 43 would nullify an HHS rule regarding subrecipients of family planning grants, administered under Title X. While framed as a “states rights” issue by proponents, this resolution is an attempt by Congressional leadership to embolden anti-women’s health state politicians to take away people's health care — specifically the four million people who rely on Title X for birth control and other care — despite the fact that Title X had helped to ensure more than four million people have health care in this country. Planned Parenthood strongly supports the Title X program and opposes any attempts to repeal or scale back the program. H.J. Res. 43 passed the House on Feb. 16, 2017 and was voted on in the Senate on March 30, 2017, where the vote came down to the razor thin 50-50 vote. When a Senate vote ends in a tie the vice president of the United States serves as the tie breaker. Vice President Pence voted in favor of H.J. Res. 43 A vote AGAINST H.J. Res. 43 was a vote in support of women’s health. The resolution passed with a vote of 51-50.

  • "Don't Make Women Sick Again" Amendment

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    During the early morning hours of Ja. 12, 2017, Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-New York) along with Sens. Mazie Hirono (D-Hawaii) and Patty Murray (D-Washington) offered an amendment to the Budget Resolution for Fiscal Year 2017 (S.Con.Res.3) that would object and oppose legislation that weakens women's health, including decreasing access to — or coverage of – critical reproductive health care services including contraceptive counseling, birth control, maternity care, and primary and preventive health care covered under the Affordable Care Act. Sen. Gillibrand’s amendment would have protected women’s access to the care they need, including the 55 million women would lose access to no-copay preventive services — including birth control, STI screenings, and life-saving preventive services such as breast cancer screenings and pap tests. A vote IN FAVOR of the Gillibrand Amendment was considered a vote in support of women's health. The amendment required 60 votes for passage, and failed with a vote of 49-49.

  • Zika Conference Bill

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    The Senate and House passed different packages of funding for Zika as an amendment to the Military Construction, Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (H.R. 2577) in early June. A House-passed conference package was sent to the Senate with harmful language that excluded family planning providers affiliated with Planned Parenthood from being part of the public health response to Zika. The Zika virus can be transmitted through mosquito bites or sexual transmission, and is known to cause complications in pregnancy such as microcephaly. The role of family planning providers in Puerto Rico and the mainland U.S. is critical in the wake of this public health crisis. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and World Health Organization have urged lawmakers to come up with a sufficient response that prioritizes reproductive and maternal health care services, including family planning. Yet the Zika Conference Report to H.R. 2577 failed to meaningfully address the threat posed by Zika, and excluded funding for family planning. In an unprecedented and irresponsible move, the Zika Conference Report redirects funds that are being utilized for the Ebola virus and other important health programs instead of funding it through new, emergency funds. Finally, the bill deeply underfunds global health programs and strips key resources from family planning providers who are on the front lines of serving the most at-risk people in communities across the country and region. A vote AGAINST H.R. 2577 was a vote in support of women’s health. The bill received a vote of 52-48, however it required 60 votes to pass.

  • Restoring Funding For Planned Parenthood And Establish A Clinic Security And ...

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    On December 3, 2015, Senator Patty Murray (D-Washington) proposed an amendment to the Restoring Americans' Healthcare Freedom Reconciliation Act (H.R. 3762) to strike the provision to defund Planned Parenthood and would provide additional Medicaid funding for reproductive health services and to enhance safety and security at clinics. Senator Murray’s amendment would have restored access to critical health care services for women, men and young people to access care at Planned Parenthood health centers and ensure that women are able to access care without fear, intimidation, harassment, or violence. After debate, Senator Mike Enzi (R-Wyoming) made a motion to table the amendment. A vote AGAINST the motion to table was considered a vote in support of women's health. The motion to table passed the Senate with a vote of 54-46.

  • Restoring Funding For Planned Parenthood

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    On Dec. 3, 2015, Sens. Susan Collins (R-Maine), Mark Kirk (R-Illinois), and Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) proposed an amendment to the Restoring Americans' Healthcare Freedom Reconciliation Act (H.R. 3762) to remove language from the underlying bill that prohibits all federal funding for Planned Parenthood health centers. The Collins, Kirk, Murkowski amendment would have ensured that federal funds be made available to Planned Parenthood health centers for preventive health care services — such as contraception, lifesaving cancer screenings, STI testing and treatment — and allow these centers to continue to provide the quality, compassionate care that millions of people in America have come to rely on for nearly 100 years. A vote FOR the amendment was a vote in support of women’s health. The amendment failed the Senate with a vote of 48-52.

  • Repealing The ACA And Defunding Planned Parenthood

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    The Senate amended and considered the House-passed version of the Restoring Americans’ Healthcare Freedom Reconciliation Act (H.R. 3762). The legislation would have eliminated Planned Parenthood’s ability to receive reimbursement for health care services provided under Medicaid and other federal programs, and rolled back the important and historic gains made for women’s health by the Affordable Care Act. While the legislation did not name Planned Parenthood, the bill applied to only a nonprofit entity that is: 1) defined as an essential community provider under the Affordable Care Act and is primarily engaged in family planning services and reproductive health; 2) provides abortion beyond limited circumstances; and 3) whose network exceeds $350 million in Medicaid billing reimbursements. This language clearly target Planned Parenthood health centers. Planned Parenthood is America’s leading women’s health care provider and advocate. Every year, Planned Parenthood delivers education and reproductive health care services to 2.4 million men, women, and young people across the United States. These essential health care services include screenings for breast and cervical cancer, testing and treatment for sexually transmitted infections (STI’s) — including testing for HIV/AIDS — and comprehensive sex education. However, this year Planned Parenthood’s ability to provide these vital services has been under attack by the vehemently anti-choice Congress elected in 2014. It should be noted, the Hyde Amendment — which Planned Parenthood opposes — already withholds insurance coverage for abortion for low-income women. A similar version of this bill passed the House on Oct. 23, 2015. A vote AGAINST H.R. 3762 was a vote in support of women’s health. The bill received a vote of 52-47-1.

  • Eliminating Funding For Planned Parenthood

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    Planned Parenthood is America’s leading women’s health care provider and advocate. Every year, Planned Parenthood delivers education and reproductive health care services to 2.4 million men, women, and young people across the United States. These essential health care services include screenings for breast and cervical cancer, testing and treatment for sexually transmitted infections (STI’s) — including testing for HIV/AIDS — and comprehensive sex education. However, this year Planned Parenthood’s ability e to provide these vital services has been under attack by the vehemently anti-choice Congress elected in 2014. This amendment, offered by Sen. Thad Cochran (R-Mississippi), is a continuing resolution to avoid a shutdown by keeping the government funded through December. The Cochran Amendment also seeks to prevent Planned Parenthood from receiving any federal funds, including Medicaid reimbursements for family planning services and funding for critical primary and preventive care. It would result in 1.5 million Medicaid patients — predominantly women — losing access to their health care providers and would severely hinder Planned Parenthood’s ability to provide quality family planning services and lifesaving preventive care in states across the country. It should be noted, the Hyde Amendment — which Planned Parenthood opposes — already prohibits these funds from being used to provide abortion services. A vote AGAINST the Cochran Amendment was a vote in support of women’s health. The amendment received a vote of 47-52.

  • Banning Abortion After 20 Weeks Nationwide

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    On Jan. 6, 2015, the first day the 114th Congress convened, Congressman Trent Franks (R-Arizona) introduced the deceptively named “Pain-Capable Unborn Child Act” which would ban all abortions at 20 weeks with very limited exceptions, marking the priority of pursuing an anti-women’s health agenda. This bill is a dangerous attempt to restrict women’s access to safe and legal abortion and requires a survivor of sexual assault to undergo compulsory medical treatment or counseling 48 hours prior to the abortion procedure. It would also subject a doctor to criminal penalties for performing a safe, legal medical procedure. This adds significant barriers for rape victims seeking safe and legal abortion – potentially requiring multiple appointments with two separate health care providers over the course of 48 hours. H.R. 36 also shames survivors of incest by denying them an exception if they are over the age of 18 and continues to require a woman under the age of 18 to report to law enforcement or a government agency before they can receive safe and legal abortion. On May 13, 2015 H.R. 36 passed the House with a vote of 242-184 and was sent to the Senate for their consideration. A vote AGAINST H.R. 36 was a vote in support of women’s health. The bill received a vote of 54-42, however it required 60 votes to pass.