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Cora has always supported Planned Parenthood. Growing up in the Minneapolis suburbs, Cora remembers how her parents “put a really high importance on talking about social issues.Her mother was a strong feminist, educating Cora on safe sex and the importance of informed decision-making in reproductive health.

As a college student, Cora’s passion for non-profit work blossomed, leading her to develop an interest in accessible health care. She became interested in how birth control availability can affect systems of power. “If you don’t have access to contraceptives, it’s taking away this whole power that women have to be able to embrace their sexuality and act on that without having these consequences,” Cora said. She remarked how “in the current state of our country, of our society, where we have really, really rigid social structures, access to birth control for all people is a first step in creating a more equitable society.”

After seeing Planned Parenthood participate in a Pride event, Cora realized how birth control can function beyond women’s sexual empowerment, helping many demographics in their attempts to break cycles of poverty and teen pregnancy. Attending a Solidarity Day rally solidified her beliefs, introducing her to a community of Planned Parenthood supporters who shared her passions.

Cora was so inspired by the Solidarity Day protest that, the following fall, she joined Planned Parenthood as a Communications Intern. She helped continue the very project she had originally participated in: Planned Parenthood’s Story Project, which interviews people who want to share their stories about why they support Planned Parenthood. Even as she saw lawmakers repeatedly attack her rights, she felt “energized and hopeful” as she saw her co-workers at Planned Parenthood return to work every day ready to fight back. “I solidified my belief that reproductive rights are a basic human right. I grew more comfortable with my sexuality, learning how to talk about it openly and comfortably. I met dozens of truly remarkable folks, and I drew from their strength,” Cora remarks about her internship.

“I left knowing that I will always be a part of this greater fight. I left confident that we won't stop fighting. I left truly believing that I have worth as a woman in this world.”

Tags: minnesota, story