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The Fight for Birth Control

Trump won’t stop trying to take away your access to birth control.

The Trump-Pence administration's final birth control rules were set to go into effect January 14, 2019. The courts stopped them just in time.

It was a win, but the fight's not over. You might not have known your birth control coverage was under attack. And that’s just how the administration wants it.

Here's what you need to know — including how you can help keep up the momentum in the #Fight4BirthControl.

What are Trump’s Birth Control Rules?

What the rules tried to do:

Gut the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) contraception mandate, which ensures access to birth control with no out-of-pocket costs.

What that would mean for you:

Your boss would get to decide whether you get access to birth control.

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What happens now:

It's a win that two federal courts temporarily blocked the rules. But we expect the administration to appeal, so we've got to keep up the pressure.

If Trump’s birth control rules went into effect, many women — especially women of color and young people — wouldn’t be able to afford birth control at all. And that’s just what Trump wants.

The rules roll back access to birth control for the 62 million women who gained access thanks to the Affordable Care Act. 

Before the Affordable Care Act, an astounding 57 percent of young women (ages 18 to 34) said they’d struggled to afford birth control.

Forty percent of Black women of reproductive age said they couldn’t afford more than $10 a month for birth control if they had to pay out of pocket.

How Much Does Your Birth Control Typically Cost Out-of-Pocket?

Without insurance, birth control pills typically cost between $15 and $50 per month. That adds up to over $600 per year. That's no small chunk of change!

IUD
up to $1,300
(lasts up to 12 years)

Birth Control Pill 
up to $50/month

Birth Control Implant
up to $1,300
(lasts up to 5 years)

Vaginal Ring 
up to $200/month

Birth Control Shot 
up to $100/every three months

Brianna's Story

Brianna's Story

Brianna shares how birth control gave her the freedom to pursue her education —as well as decide when and if she wants to have children.

I've taken birth control since I went away to college. I think birth control has helped give me that control over my life. It's enabled me to get my bachelor's and now to go back to school for nursing.

Sign the Petition!

We need your help. Tell your elected officials:

I oppose the administration's latest attempt to let bosses and schools refuse to provide birth control coverage.

America just elected a pro-reproductive health care majority to the U.S. House, and I urge you to join them in defending access to basic health care like birth control.

 

A Brief History of the Trump-Pence Administration's RELENTLESS Attempts to Let Your Boss Deny You Access to Birth Control

If the birth control rules sound familiar, it’s because we’ve fought off this attack before. The Trump-Pence administration just won't give up on trying to roll back your access to birth control coverage.

October 6, 2017

The administration releases its birth control rules, which would make it easier for bosses and schools to refuse to cover birth control.

December 20-21, 2017  

BLOCKED! Two federal courts stop the administration’s birth control rules from taking effect.

November 7, 2018 

The administration tries AGAIN. It makes tiny tweaks to the birth control rules and releases a “final” version — set to take effect January 14, 2019.

January 13-14, 2019 
 

NOT TODAY, TRUMP! Yet again, two federal courts block the administration's rules — just before they were set to take effect.

Today

The rules are blocked, but we expect the administration to appeal and try again. We need your help to #Fight4BirthControl.

Who’s Behind Trump's Birth Control Rules?

Meet the Trump officials quietly working behind the scenes to roll back your reproductive choices.

Many have spent their entire careers trying to erode access to birth control. And Trump’s not just giving them desk jobs — he’s putting them in charge of leading our nation's programs and policies around sexual and reproductive health care. 

Matthew Bowman
Deputy General Counsel

Bowman was a principal author of the administration’s birth control rules.

[Employers who provide insurance coverage for contraception]kill embryos and bow to the altar of fruitless intercourse.

 

Katy Talento
White House Domestic Policy Council

Talento helped write the administration’s birth control rules. 

...The longer you stay on the pill, the more likely you are to ruin your uterus for baby-hosting.

 

Alex Azar
U.S. Secretary of Health

Azar thinks it's an expression of "American values" for your boss to decide whether you get birth control.

We have to balance a woman's choice of insurance with the conscience of their employers.

 

The Reality? Americans Want Access to Birth Control

Birth control is basic health care — the kind of basic care that nine in 10 women will use at some point in their lives.

Research shows that the overwhelming majority of Americans believe women should have birth control coverage — regardless of their employer’s personal objections.

Taking away access to birth control is a big step backwards for our country. According to the Guttmacher Institute, the majority of women said that using birth control allowed them to take better care of themselves or their families, support themselves financially, complete their education, and advance in their careers.

Increased access to birth control is linked to:

Say it with us: 

Birth control coverage isn’t controversial — it gives people power and control over their own lives. #Fight4BirthControl

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